Friday, February 04, 2005

I guess our legal system leaves no good deed unpunished...

At first, I thought this might be a joke or an urban legend, but sadly it doesn't appear to be. I guess the two girls in the story did learn a hard life lesson: Don't try to do a good deed after 10 PM, especially if you have a nervous, sue-happy neighbor who might make you regret it. (Via Overlawyered.)

Update: Symtym has weighed in on the issue here and provided additional links about the story.

6 example(s) of insolence returned:

At 2/04/2005 3:12 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

i think this was the moment my sense of outrage finally expired. i'm condemned to just shrug and sigh at everything i hear from now on.



At 2/05/2005 10:14 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

She was 49 and living alone, with a couple of idiots banging at her door, must have thought she was going to die, how could those girls been so stupid? 10pm. I'm usually in bed by then.


At 2/05/2005 1:28 PM, Blogger Orac said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.


At 2/05/2005 1:30 PM, Blogger Orac said...

Whether the girls were acting stupidly or not is besides the point. A letter of apology or an in-person apology from the girls should have been more than enough, and if the woman didn't have health insurance, then the father should have offered to pay the E.R. bill. Suing two teenaged girls for trying to do a good deed is massive overkill and symptomatic of the out-of-control tort system in this country. At least the judge had enough sanity left not to impose any sort of punitive damages.

In any case, the girls didn't knock on any doors if the lights were out at the house and tried to make sure that people were awake at the houses they visited; so if the woman had been in bed they wouldn't have bothered her.


At 2/06/2005 10:08 AM, Blogger Kristjan said...

From this article about the incident:

"Several days later, Young found out who had left the cookies on her doorstep while speaking on the telephone with Taylor Ostergaard's mother, Jill Ostergaard, who offered to pay for expenses related to the incident not covered by Young's health insurance plan.

The girls also wrote a note of apology to Young, but on the advice of an attorney, they opted not to meet with her in person.

Several weeks later, the Taylors and Ostergaards sent Young an attorney-authored agreement outlining their intention to pay Young and releasing the two families from any further financial liability related to the incident."

So they did try to make the proper amends, yet it was rejected.


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